Collections by Rob W RWCS Photographics

Balcombe Viaduct Sussex 28 images

Built in 1841, the Ouse Valley Viaduct (also called Balcombe Viaduct) over the River Ouse on the London-Brighton Railway Line north of Haywards Heath and south of Balcombe is 1,475 feet (450 m) long, 96 feet (29 m) high and is carried on 37 semi-circular arches with pierced piers. An extremely elegant railway viaduct that carries the London to Brighton main line over the River Ouse. It was designed by engineer John Urpeth Rastrick in association with the architect of the London to Brighton railway, David Mocatta. Construction completed 1842. The 11 million bricks needed for its construction travelled up the Ouse River (via Newhaven and Lewes) from Holland. It was restored in 1996. The structure is a Grade II listed building. The viaduct is still used, with around 110 trains a day passing over it on the Brighton Main Line. The viaduct's arches are semi-circular and constructed in red brick. Each spans 37ft. The piers are tapered both side and end-on and divided in two by 10ft wide weight-saving voids, which are capped by six-ring brick arches. Thus the whole has a slender appearance. The parapets of Caen stone and take the form of classical balustrading. This stone is also used for string courses, pier caps and the two small italianate pavilions set at each end of the bridge. At its highest point, the bridge is 96ft above the river

DEWSTOW Gardens 49 images

Imagine discovering a lost garden with tunnels and underground grottoes buried under thousands of tons of soil for over 50 years. That’s what happened at Dewstow gardens. Built around 1895 the gardens were buried just after ww11 and rediscovered in 2000. The gardens were created around the turn of the century by "James Pulham & Sons" landscapers, Rock Builders and Garden Designers. The gardens had been buried around the 1940s and 50s and after excavation, although some areas were in very poor condition, other parts remained as good as the day the gardens were built. Most of the repairs have now been completed during a massive restoration operation which began in 2000. The gardens contain many ponds and rills but interestingly a labyrinth of underground grottoes, tunnels and sunken ferneries.The rock gardens are made up of a mixture of real stone and faced stone using various types of Pulhamite. The site is approximately 7 acres and we hope to renovate as much as we possibly can and have landscaped and replanted the gardens over the past 10 years.

DEWSTOW Gardens and Grottoes 43 images

The Underground Gardens at Dewstow : Imagine discovering a lost garden with tunnels and underground grottoes buried under thousands of tons of soil for over 50 years. That’s what happened at Dewstow gardens. Built around 1895 the gardens were buried just after ww11 and rediscovered in 2000. The gardens were created around the turn of the century by "James Pulham & Sons" landscapers, Rock Builders and Garden Designers. The gardens had been buried around the 1940s and 50s and after excavation, although some areas were in very poor condition, other parts remained as good as the day the gardens were built. Most of the repairs have now been completed during a massive restoration operation which began in 2000. The gardens contain many ponds and rills but interestingly a labyrinth of underground grottoes, tunnels and sunken ferneries.The rock gardens are made up of a mixture of real stone and faced stone using various types of Pulhamite. The site is approximately 7 acres and the Harris family replanted the gardens over the past 10 years.

Dungeness 44 images

Dungeness is not truly a village, more a scattered collection of dwellings. Some of the homes, small wooden houses in the main, many built around old railway coaches, are owned and lived in by fishermen, whose boats lie on the beach; some are occupied by people trying to escape the pressured outside world. The shack-like properties have a high value on the property market. Perhaps the most famous house is Prospect Cottage, formerly owned by the late artist and film director Derek Jarman. The cottage itself is painted black, with a poem, part of John Donne's "The Sunne Rising", written on one side in black lettering. The garden however is the main attraction. Reflecting the bleak, windswept landscape of the peninsula, Derek Jarman's garden is made of pebbles, driftwood, scrap metal and a few hardy plants. The Village has two Public Houses "The Pilot" and "The Britannia", both serving seafood. There are more solidly-built houses around the site of the power stations. Fresh seafood can be purchased from several outlets across the shingle.

Ice Prince Wreck Worthing Beach January 2008 23 images

Timber from the wrecked freighter Ice Prince inundates Worthing's beaches in Sussex

iceland 9 images

photos in iceland

Industrial Heritage Collection 25 images

General collection of photos

motorsport & cars 34 images

cars motorsport rallying racing

Mount Etna Sicily : ITALY 35 images

Mount Etna, towering above Catania, Sicily's second largest city, has one of the world's longest documented records of historical volcanism. Historical lava flows cover much of the surface of this massive basaltic stratovolcano, Italy's highest and most voluminous volcano. The Mongibello stratovolcano, truncated by several small calderas, was constructed during the late Pleistocene and Holocene over an older shield volcano. The most prominent morphological feature of Etna is the Valle del Bove, a 5 x 10 km horseshoe-shaped caldera open to the east. Two styles of eruptive activity typically occur at Etna. Persistent explosive eruptions, sometimes with minor lava emissions, take place from one or more of the three prominent summit craters, the Central Crater, NE Crater, and SE Crater (the latter formed in 1978). Flank vents, typically with higher effusion rates, produce eruptions from fissures that open progressively downward from near the summit (usually accompanied by strombolian eruptions at the upper end). Cinder cones are commonly constructed over the vents of lower flank lava flows. Lava flows extend to the foot of the volcano on all sides and have reached the sea over a broad area on the SE flank

Nature 10 images

Assorted nature based collection

Provence: France 2011 52 images

No other region of France stirs the imagination and stimulates the senses as strongly as Provence. The soft light and its vivid landscape of pastel colours have inspired writers and artists from F. Scott Fitzgerald and Pagnol to Van Gogh and Picasso. The fragrant countryside with its wild herbs is scattered with historic fortified medieval towns to explore, and if all you want to do is relax there can be few better places than the South of France, with its glorious weather, delicious food and fine wines.

Sussex 30 images

Sussex from the Old English Sūþsēaxe ('South Saxons'), is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. Clockwise, it is bounded to the west by Hampshire; north by Surrey, north-east by Kent, south by the English Channel and is divided for local government into West Sussex and East Sussex and the city of Brighton and Hove. Brighton and Hove was created as a unitary authority in 1997, and was granted City status in 2000. Until then, Chichester had been Sussex's only city. Sussex has three main geographic sub-regions, each oriented approximately east to west. In the south-west of the county lies the fertile and densely populated coastal plain. North of this lie the rolling chalk hills of the South Downs, beyond which lies the well-wooded Sussex Weald. The name 'Sussex' derives from the Kingdom of Sussex, according to legend it was founded by Ælle of Sussex in 477 AD, then in 825 it was absorbed into the kingdom of Wessex and the later kingdom of England. The region's roots go back further to the location of some of Europe's earliest hominid finds at Boxgrove. Sussex has been a key location for England's major invasions, including the Roman invasion of Britain and the Battle of Hastings. In 1974, the Lord-Lieutenant of Sussex was replaced with one each for East and West Sussex, which became separate ceremonial counties. Sussex continues to be recognised as a geographical territory and cultural region. It has had a single police force since 1968 and its name is in common use in the media. In 2007, Sussex Day was created to celebrate Sussex's rich culture and history. Based on the traditional emblem of Sussex, a blue shield with six gold martlets, the flag of Sussex was recognised by the Flag Institute in 2011. In 2013, Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government Eric Pickles formally recognised and acknowledged the continued existence of England's 39 historic counties, including Sussex.

Sussex Aerial Photographs 2 images

Sussex from the Old English Sūþsēaxe ('South Saxons'), is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. Clockwise, it is bounded to the west by Hampshire; north by Surrey, north-east by Kent, south by the English Channel and is divided for local government into West Sussex and East Sussex and the city of Brighton and Hove. Brighton and Hove was created as a unitary authority in 1997, and was granted City status in 2000. Until then, Chichester had been Sussex's only city. Sussex has three main geographic sub-regions, each oriented approximately east to west. In the south-west of the county lies the fertile and densely populated coastal plain. North of this lie the rolling chalk hills of the South Downs, beyond which lies the well-wooded Sussex Weald. The name 'Sussex' derives from the Kingdom of Sussex, according to legend it was founded by Ælle of Sussex in 477 AD, then in 825 it was absorbed into the kingdom of Wessex and the later kingdom of England. The region's roots go back further to the location of some of Europe's earliest hominid finds at Boxgrove. Sussex has been a key location for England's major invasions, including the Roman invasion of Britain and the Battle of Hastings. In 1974, the Lord-Lieutenant of Sussex was replaced with one each for East and West Sussex, which became separate ceremonial counties. Sussex continues to be recognised as a geographical territory and cultural region. It has had a single police force since 1968 and its name is in common use in the media. In 2007, Sussex Day was created to celebrate Sussex's rich culture and history. Based on the traditional emblem of Sussex, a blue shield with six gold martlets, the flag of Sussex was recognised by the Flag Institute in 2011. In 2013, Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government Eric Pickles formally recognised and acknowledged the continued existence of England's 39 historic counties, including Sussex.