• This false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the 'South Pillar' region of th

    Image ID
    FOT1206312
    Rights
    RM Rights Managed
    Image Details
    Image File Attributes
    9.2 MB
    JPEG
    Image Dimensions
    4947 x 3886 px
    Image Print Size (at 300 ppi)
    419 x 329 mm
    16.5 x 13.0 in
    Visual Size @300ppi
    Keywords
    Astronomy stock image stock photo
    Description
    This false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the 'South Pillar' region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Though the nebula's most famous and massive star, Eta Carinae, is too bright to be observed by infrared telescopes, the downward-streaming rays hint at its presence above the picture frame. Ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from Eta Carinae and its siblings have shredded the cloud to pieces, leaving a mess of tendrils and pillars. This shredding process triggered the birth of the new stars uncovered by Spitzer. This image was taken by the infrared array camera on Spitzer. It is a three-color composite of invisible light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange), and 8.0 microns (red).
    Uploader
    Samuel Corbyn-Manning
    Contributor
    World History Archive
    Date Taken
    2014-08-06
    Uploaded on
    2014-11-19
    Collection
    World History Archive
    Category
    Heritage
    Sub Category
    History
    Dominant colour
    #201010